UN Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI) | IAS Target IAS Target

UN Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI)

The United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI) is one of the five United Nations Research and Training Institutes. The Institute was established in 1968 to support the international community in formulating and implementing improved policies in the field of crime prevention and criminal justice. In 1965, the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) outlined Resolution the organizational arrangements for a United Nations Social Defence Programme. Later, the United Nations Social Defence Research Institute (UNSDRI) was established and its headquarters is in Rome. In 1989, the institute was renamed the “United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI)”.

Headquarter Turin.
Parent organization United Nations Economic and Social Council
Report Report on counterfeiting and organized crime

Aims and functions

The Institute carries out action-oriented research, training, and technical cooperation programmes, with the aim of assisting governments and the international community at large in tackling the threats that crime poses to social peace, development, and political stability and in fostering the development of just and efficient justice systems. UNICRI supports the formulation and implementation of improved policies in the field of crime prevention and justice, the promotion of national self-reliance, and the development of institutional capabilities.
The Institute works to increase the understanding of crime-related problems, supporting the respect for international instruments and standards. It facilitates the exchange and dissemination of information, cooperation in international law enforcement, and judicial assistance. UNICRI structures its activities to meet the identified needs of member states. Its programme activities arise from priorities identified by the UN Annual Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Commission. The Institute's current priorities include, inter alia, activities related to organized crime, judicial reform, juvenile justice, security and counter-terrorism, major event security, international criminal law, corruption, human trafficking, victim protection, counterfeiting, cybercrime, crimes against the environment, and drug abuse. The Institute is a firm believer in the importance and benefits of close international and cross-regional cooperation. It encourages the sharing of information at all levels.